On a beautiful Sunday my family and I went downtown to the Market at The Rocks. I visited several galleries selling Aboriginal art. It is so interesting to me. Colorful and very intricate in design.

Aboriginal art is based on important ancient stories: even contemporary Aboriginal art, is based on stories (Jukurrpa) and symbols centred on ‘the Dreamtime’ – the period in which Indigenous people believe the world was created. The Dreamtime stories are up to and possibly even exceeding 50,000 years old, and have been handed down through the generations virtually unchanged for all those years.
Aboriginal art also stands as a written language: Aboriginal art is a major part of the unwritten ‘encyclopedia’ of being an Aboriginal person and as such it may have many layers of meaning. Australian Aboriginal people have no written language of their own, and so the important stories central to the people’s culture are based on the traditional icons (symbols) and information in the artwork, which go hand in hand with recounted stories, dance or song, helping to pass on vital information and preserve their culture.

 

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Aboriginal art gallery

Aboriginal art gallery

Aboriginal art gallery

Aboriginal art gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal art gallery

Aboriginal art gallery

 

After that we took a walk around Circular Quay to have lunch at the Opera House Cafe,  just underneath the famous building, and watched an exciting international sailing regatta with rather large boats from about 10 countries. The boats don’t look very big here, but they were! it was very windy and these boats were,absolutely flying. The course was small and tight, I guess the most nimble and strong sailors won! I probably should have had a zoom lens. The French won and the British lost.

 

sydney harbor sailing regatta

On our leisurely stroll back to the ferry (since the undersigned couldn’t walk back across the bridge), we came by the Lindt Cafe, where on the next day that deranged Iranian terrorist killed two innocent civilians, one being a woman who protected her pregnant friend with her body. Close calls like this hit home and teach you to appreciate every moment of your life. You never know about tomorrow…..

Running to catch the ferry, we caught the wrong one and ended up on a beautiful cruise around the harbor with the ferry’s various stopping points. It was such a lovely day. Little did we know that next day the whole area would be closed and the whole city would be on alert!

In downtown Sydney is an old building called the QVB (Queen Victoria Building), built 1883-1891. It’s style is Romanesque Revival. It’s rather narrow, only about 90 feet wide and about 570 feet long. It’s a shopping mall. It has very nice stores (they call them ‘shops’ in Australia) as well as restaurants. We went to have lunch and High Tea combined, very British, they even had cucumber sandwiches among the High Tea items. It’s really worth visiting, the building that is, although I don’t know if I woukd have the High Tea again. Here are some pictures

 

Beautiful floor tiles inside QVB

Beautiful floor tiles inside QVB

The Queen Victoria Building is now a chic shopping mall

The Queen Victoria Building is now a chic shopping mall

 

 

Beautiful Victorian leaded glass windows

Beautiful Victorian leaded glass windows

 

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